Volunteers are invited to take part in a moth trapping session on Friday 27 September at West Street cemetery in Farnham.

No experience or special knowledge is needed and by taking part volunteers will play an important part in measuring how healthy the local moth population is. The session is taking place to complement national Moth Night activities planned for 26 to 28 September.

“Moths are a really important indicator of the health of our environment. They are very sensitive to change so the number and range of species we measure in a monitoring session give us very helpful clues to changes in our environment. Taking part in our moth trapping session is a practical and fun way of helping our environment and supporting local wildlife,” says Councillor Carole Cockburn, Lead Member for Cemeteries.

The session will begin around 7.30pm and last until approximately 11pm depending on conditions. To take part, volunteers should wear warm clothing and shoes suitable for wet grass, a chilly night and the weather conditions. They should also bring a torch, and a portable seat is advisable but not essential. Children are welcome but must be accompanied by an adult.

Farnham Biodiversity Group has organised the event and will post the results on their website at www.farnhambap.org.uk/. All moths will be released at the end of the count.

To register to take part, contact Farnham Town Council on 01252 712667 or email lara.miller@farnham.gov.uk giving details about how many of you would like to take part and your contact telephone number. Queries about the event can be emailed to mvangel37@gmail.com. The event is reliant on appropriate weather so volunteers’ contact details are needed in case it is cancelled at short notice. Joining instructions will also be provided upon registration.

Moths and their caterpillars play a vital role in the ecosystem providing food for numerous birds, bats, frogs, spiders, hedgehogs and other small mammals. Some of the UK’s favourite birds, including blue tits, rely on moths to rear their young.

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